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Periodicals

Image: IOS/neverflash.com
Image: IOS/neverflash.com

Digitized newspapers

Newspapers reflect cultural transfers that are of particular importance in multiethnic regions such as Central and Eastern Europe. Moreover, the press has initiated and reflected on discourses on identities and policies which, in light of the growing nationalism in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, provided an impetus that had far-reaching consequences for the German-speaking minorities in Eastern Europe too. The newspapers produced by Germans as well as German-speaking Jews in the region were consequently an important channel for those populations to engage with their own identity and to reflect on other ethnic groups.

In order to make this source material accessible in an appealing format, the following 52 newspapers were digitized as part of the projects German-Language Periodicals from Central and East EuropeDigital Consolidation of Collections and Documentation of German-Language Periodicals from Eastern Europe, and Jewish German-Language Periodicals from Eastern Europe, funded by the Federal Government Commissioner for Culture and the Media. The scholarly description helps users categorize them by content, geographically, and temporarily. For further information, see the four volumes of the Bibliographie deutschsprachiger Periodika aus dem östlichen Europa (Bibliography of German-Language Periodicals from Eastern Europe) by Albert Weber.

Banater Deutsche Zeitung (Temeschwar/Timişoara, 1925-1941)
Deutscher Volksfreund (Werschetz, 1903-1942)
Deutsches Bauernblatt (Budapest, 1913-1919)
Deutsches Tageblatt (Budapest, 1917—1919)
Gottscheer Zeitung (Gottschee/Kočevje, 1919—1941)
Der Heideboden (Ungarisch-Altenburg, 1919—1931)
Kaukasische Post (Tiflis, 1906—1914, 1918—1922)
Kronstädter Zeitung (Kronstadt/Braşov, 1849—1944)
Marburger Zeitung (Marburg an der Drau/Maribor, 1862—1945)
Neue Post (Budapest, 1917—1920)
Neues Budapester Abendblatt (Budapest, 1899—1920)
Oedenburger Proletarier (Ödenburg, 1919)
Oedenburger Zeitung (Ödenburg, 1875—1944)
Der Siebenbürger Bote (Hermannstadt/Sibiu, 1792—1862)
Siebenbürgisch-Deutsches Tageblatt (Hermannstadt/Sibiu, 1874—1941)
Südböhmische Volkszeitung (Budweis/České Budějovice 1901—1938)
Vereinigte Ofner Pester Zeitung (Budapest, 1800—1845)
Volksstimme (Budapest, 1894—1924)
Weckruf (Ödenburg, 1919)
Westungarischer Grenzbote (Pressburg/Pozson/Bratislava, 1872—1919)

Jewish German-Language Periodicals

The project Jüdische deutschsprachige Periodika aus dem östlichen Europa (Jewish German-Language Periodicals from Eastern Europe) (2015–2016), funded by the Federal Government Commissioner for Culture and the Media, resulted in the digitization of 32 historical newspapers with the aim of supporting future research on the history and culture of Jewish German-language communities in Eastern Europe. For further information, see the fourth volume of the Bibliographie deutschsprachiger Periodika aus dem östlichen Europa by Albert Weber.

Das Abendland (Prag, 1864—1868)
Allgemeine illustrierte Judenzeitung (Pest, 1860—1862)
Allgemeine jüdische Rundschau (Budapest, 1907—1911)
Breslauer Jüdisches Gemeindeblatt (Breslau, 1924—1937)
Die Gegenwart (Prag, 1867—1870)
Hamechaker (Budapest, 1877—1881)
Israelitische Gemeinde-Zeitung (Prag, 1897—1901)
Israelitischer Lehrerbote (Melnik, 1875—1883)
Jeschurun (Pleschen; Posen, 1901—1904)
Jüdische Gemeinde- und Schulzeitung (Budapest, 1873—1874)
Jüdische Pester Zeitung (Pest, 1870—1888)
Jüdische Volkszeitung (Breslau, 1914—1921)
Jüdische Woche (Zsido Hét) (Temeschwar, 1932)
Jüdische Zeitung (Breslau, 1932—1937)
Jüdische Zeitung für Ostdeutschland (Breslau, 1925—1931)
Jüdischer Pester Lloyd (Budapest, 1875)
Jüdisches Volksblatt (Breslau, 1910—1913)
Jüdisches Volksblatt (Budapest, 1891—1893)
Jung Juda (Prag, 1901—1931)
Mitteilungs-Blatt des Jüdischen Volksrats Posen (Posen, 1919)
Neue Jüdische Pester Zeitung (Budapest, 1884—1888)
Neue Jüdische Rundschau (Czernowitz, 1926—1930)
Neue Jüdische Zeitung (Budapest, 1881—1884)
Neue Zeit / Uj Kor (Temeschwar, 1923—1930)
Ostjüdische Zeitung (Tscherniwzi, 1919—1937)
Pressburger Jüdische Zeitung (Pressburg, 1908—1909)
Selbstwehr (Prag, 1920—1926)
Ungarisch-jüdische Wochenschrift (Pest, 1871—1872)
Der ungarische Israelit (Budapest, 1874—1908)
Der ungarische Israelit (Pest, 1848)
Ungarländische Jüdische Zeitung (Pressburg, Budapest, 1910—1915)
Die Wahrheit (Prag, 1871—1872)

Digitized almanacs

Almanacs offer researchers a perspective that complements the medium of newspapers. While newspapers primarily served the inhabitants of urban areas, almanacs tended to be read by parts of the population that did not often read newspapers or that lived in rural areas. In addition to their chronological and literary sections, these publications featured, for example, lists of tradesmen and businesses as well as officials, officers, clergy, and teachers, and also train schedules, announcements of annual fairs, indexes of regional companies, organizations, schools, and homeowners. There was often also space for personal notes. Almanacs are thus well suited for researching the lifestyle and reading habits of rural populations.

In order to make this source material accessible in an appealing format, the following 38 almanacs were digitized as part of the projects German-Language Periodicals from Central and East EuropeDigital Consolidation of Collections and Documentation of German-Language Periodicals from Eastern Europe, and Jewish German-Language Periodicals from Eastern Europe, funded by the Federal Government Commissioner for Culture and the Media. For further information, see the four volumes of the Bibliographie deutschsprachiger Periodika aus dem östlichen Europa  by Albert Weber.

Adressenbuch der königlich freien Stadt Kronstadt (Kronstadt, 1845-1916)
Berg-Kalender (Schmöllnitz, 1839—1841)
Christlicher Hausfreund (Sibiu, 1930)
Compaß für Siebenbürgen (Kronstadt, 1854—1871)
Deutscher Evangelischer Familienkalender (St. Petersburg, 1912)
Deutscher Volksfreund (Saratow, 1911)
Deutscher Volkskalender für Bessarabien (Tarutino, 1920—1940)
Deutscher Volkskalender für Stadt und Land (Kronstadt, 1905—1938)
Deutscher Volkskalender für Stadt und Land (Odessa, 1909—1912)
Gottscheer Kalender (Gottschee/Kočevska, 1921—1941)
Der Herold (Kronstadt/Braşov, 1839—1843)
Illustrierter Molotschnaer Volks-Kalender für die deutschen Ansiedler in Süd-Rußland (Prischib, 1913, 1914)
Kalender der Deutschen Grossromäniens (Kronstadt/Braşov, 1921)
Kalender der deutschen Vereine in Liv-, Est- und Kurland (Riga, 1908—1914)
Kalender des Hermannstädter Kinderschutzvereins (Hermannstadt/Sibiu, 1931—1941)
Kalender des Siebenbürger Volksfreunds (Hermannstadt, 1870—1941)
Kaukasischer Kalender (Tiflis, 1912)
Kronstädter Adressen-Kalender (Kronstadt/Braşov, 1909—1916)
Kronstädter Kalender (Kronstadt/Braşov, 1803—1908)
Livländischer Kalender (Riga, 1822—1918)
Neuer Haus- und Landwirtschafts-Kalender für deutsche Ansiedler im südlichen Rußland (Odessa, 1906—1913)
Neuer Kronstädter Kalender (Kronstadt, 1900—1904)
Der nützliche Rathgeber (Kronstadt, 1839—1850)

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